Calendar


RECENT HAPPENINGS

E.g., 09-21-2018

September 2018

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Ensuring Meaningful Access to Limited English Proficient Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence Webinar Series -- Part I: Understanding Culture and Language: A Foundation for Providing Culturally Responsive Services
Link to register: https://events-na1.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2297520381/en/events/event/shared/default_template_simple/event_registration.html?sco-id=2632459996&_charset_=utf-8&utm_source=Partners+events+8%2F15%2F18&utm_campaign=Webinars+late+Aug&utm_medium=email

Provided by: National Latin@ Network
Date: September 1, 2018
Time: 3:00 am – 4:30 am ChST

Session I of the series will engage participants in learning to recognize and respect individual cultural differences regarding language and communication as important to working in a sensitive and effective manner with survivors with limited English proficiency. Language is a way of communicating thoughts and feelings. It can also constitute a means of asserting one's identity, rights and safety. Survivors of diverse communities may face challenges when systems of help do not acknowledge language as a cultural identity.  Ensuring meaningful access to limited English proficient (LEP) survivors of domestic and sexual violence means recognizing how gender bias and cultural identity may prevent access to services.  This webinar will examine the challenges LEP survivors encounter while seeking to access services because of limited culturally and linguistically responsive systems of help.
 
 
 
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Office Closed
In Observance of Labor Day
 
 
Building Strong Organizational Collaborations
Link to register: https://events-na1.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2154191300/en/events/event/shared/default_template_simple/event_registration.html?sco-id=2403105187&_charset_=utf-8&utm_source=Partners+events+9%2F1%2F18&utm_campaign=Webinars+early+Sept&utm_medium=email
Provided by: National LGBTQ Institute on IPV
Date: Wednesday, September 5, 2018
Time: 5:00 am – 6:30 am ChST

Stronger Together! This webinar will lead an exploration of collaborations among mainstream, culturally specific and LGBTQ specific anti-violence organizations. What makes for a productive collaboration? How can mainstream organization support the work of community-specific organization while avoiding of pitfalls of co-optation? What are opportunities to plug in? Join this webinar for practical ideas and start strengthening your collaborations today!
 
 
Strategies for the Prevention, Response, and Recovery from Acts of Violence in Schools
Link to register: https://events-na8.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1110525827/en/events/event/shared/default_template_simple/event_registration.html?sco-id=2344847487&_charset_=utf-8&utm_source=JUVJUST082218&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=JUVJUST&utm_content=webinar
Provided by: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and the Police Foundation
Date: Thursday, September 6, 2018
Time: 4:00 am – 5:00 am ChST


OJJDP Webinar Series To Discuss Averting School Violence


OJJDP, in collaboration with the Police Foundation, will present a two-part webinar series on averting school violence. These webinars will address school violence prevention, response, and recovery.

On August 29, 2018, from 2 to 3 p.m. ET, “Learning Lessons From the School Attack That Didn’t Happen – The Police Foundation’s Averted School Violence Database” will provide an overview of the database that the Police Foundation has developed and uses to share information on both averted and completed acts of school violence. Presenters will also discuss training in schools to identify behavior that can lead to violence.

On September 5, 2018, from 2 to 3 p.m. ET, “Strategies for the Prevention, Response, and Recovery from Acts of Violence in Schools” will discuss ongoing efforts to prevent, respond to, and recover from school violence. Presenters will explore lessons learned, best practices, and the role of school resource officers in school violence prevention.

RESOURCES:

 
The Dakota County Electronic Crimes Task Force
Link to register: http://www.bwjp.org/training/webinar-dakota-county-electronic-crimes-task-force.html?utm_source=All+Subscribers&utm_campaign=bf8423714d-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_07_30_04_16_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_347d47d8e9-bf8423714d-132884909
Provided by: Battered Women’s Justice Project
Date: Thursday, September 6, 2018
Time: 5:00 am – 6:30 am ChST

Content: Domestic violence abusers are increasingly using technology to stalk and harass their victims. Often this involves the victim’s cell phone. Until recently, having a cell phone examined could mean being without the device for anywhere from a few hours to a few days. Especially in rural areas, the loss of a cell phone for even a short period is a significant barrier, as a victim’s cell phone is a necessary link to safety. Dakota County, Minnesota is addressing this problem with an Improving Criminal Justice Response (ICJR) grant providing funding dedicated to electronic domestic violence crimes. The grant expands an existing Electronic Crimes Unit (ECU) of the Dakota County Sheriff’s Office (DCSO).The ECU has been focusing on crimes which contain electronic evidence. The ECU has expanded capabilities to better serve the victims of sexual and domestic violence, including the ability to quickly attain evidence from the victim at their place of residence or while seeking medical care following an incident. Presenters will describe their program, how the Task Force operates, and share some examples of case outcomes.  

Presenters: Tim Leslie, Sheriff, Dakota County Sheriff’s Office and Daniel Bianconi, Captain, Dakota County Sheriff’s Office

Learn more and register now!
 
Evidentiary Issues in Teen Cyber Abuse Cases
Link to register: https://ta2ta.org/webinars/registration/evidentiary-issues-in-teen-cyber-abuse-cases.html
Provided by: Break the Cycle
Date: Saturday, September 8, 2018
Time: 3:00 am ChST

Evidentiary Issues in Teen Cyber Abuse Cases 
Nicole Beck, Staff Attorney at Break the Cycle
 
This webinar will explore best practices for criminal justice professionals, including judges, prosecutors, police, victim advocates, and campus safety personnel, who work with students around gathering and preserving evidence related to cyber abuse. 
 
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Stalking 2.0: The Use of Technology to Stalk
Link to register:https://events-na1.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2361243497/en/events/event/private/2359510337/2424280655/event_registration.html?sco-id=2647037181&_charset_=utf-8
Provided by: Battered Women’s Justice Project
Date: Tuesday, September 11, 2018
Time: 5:00 am – 6:30 am ChST

Content: Approximately 7.5 million individuals are stalked every year in the United States. Rapid advances in technology give stalkers additional tools to locate, surveil, and monitor their victims. This webinar will address common technologies utilized by stalkers, discuss evidence preservation concerns as well as identify effective safety-planning strategies. By the end of this webinar, participants will be better able to: Identify common technologies misused by perpetrators, and Identify strategies to document stalking and preserve technological evidence.

Presenter: Jennifer Landhuis, Stalking Prevention, Awareness, and Resource Center 

Learn more and register now!
 
2018 kNOw MORE Community Advocate Training
2018 kNOw MORE Community Advocate Training

 
2018 kNOw MORE Roundtable
2018 kNOw MORE Roundtable

 
Trauma-Informed Addiction Treatment for Women
Link to register: https://ncdvtmh.webex.com/mw3300/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=ncdvtmh&utm_source=Partners+events+9%2F1%2F18&utm_campaign=Webinars+early+Sept&utm_medium=email
Provided by: National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health
Date: Wednesday, September 12, 2018
Time: 3:30 am – 5:00 am ChST


This webinar will discuss the connection between addiction and trauma in the lives of women. Definitions will be provided for trauma-informed, trauma-responsive and gender-responsive services, and research will be reviewed highlighting the importance of women-centered addiction treatment. The webinar is designed to help service providers consider what addressing trauma actually means in the context of addiction treatment, and more specifically, what is involved in providing trauma-informed addiction treatment for women.
 
 
Ensuring Meaningful Access to Limited English Proficient Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence Webinar Series -- Part II: Working With Interpreters
Link to register: https://events-na1.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2297520381/en/events/event/shared/default_template_simple/event_registration.html?sco-id=2632573293&_charset_=utf-8&utm_source=Partners+events+9%2F1%2F18&utm_campaign=Webinars+early+Sept&utm_medium=email
Provided by: National Latin@ Network
Date: Thursday, September 13, 2018
Time: 3:00 am – 4:30 am ChS

Session II of the series will focus on language (spoken or sign) as a crucial component of any agency's effort seeking to improve the life, safety and well-being of Limited English Proficient (LEP), as well as Deaf and Hard of Hearing (D/d/HoH) victims of domestic violence/sexual assault (DV/SA) and their families. Individuals are more likely to seek help when those services are offered in their primary language.

This training is designed for service providers to learn about equitable communication when serving and engaging with individuals who are LEP or D/d/HoH with the support of an interpreter.
 
 
IPV/Human Trafficking and Substance Abuse and Treatment, With a Lens on Behavioral Health, Substance Abuse Programs and DV Agencies
Link to register: https://www.futureswithoutviolence.org/ipvhuman-trafficking-substance-abuse-treatment-lens-behavioral-health-substance-abuse-programs-dv-agencies/?utm_source=Partners+events+9%2F1%2F18&utm_campaign=Webinars+early+Sept&utm_medium=email
Provided by: Futures Without Violence  
Date: Thursday, September 13, 2018
Time: 4:00 am – 5:00 am ChST


This webinar is part of a four-part webinar series aims to foster partnerships community health centers and domestic violence programs participating in Project Catalyst and to promote the safety, health, and healing for survivors of IPV and Human Trafficking seeking services in either community health centers (CHCs) or domestic violence (DV) agencies. This series will offer peer to peer learning and problem solving for CHCs and DV agencies.

This webinar will explore the intersections of IPV and human trafficking with substance use and treatment. It will also highlight the role of behavioral health, substance use program, and DV agencies in prevention and intervention.
 
 
The Economic Cost of Intimate Partner Violence: Implications for Prevention
Link to register: https://calcasa.ilinc.com/perl/ilinc/lms/register.pl?activity_id=cxhwhhx&user_id=
Provided by: National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, PreventConnect, and the Center for Disease Control Web Conference
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018
Time: 4:00 am – 5:00 am ChST


New Report and Web Conference on the Costs to Society from Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)

The costs from intimate partner violence (IPV) are substantial, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (AJPM). The study used nationally-representative data from CDC’s 2012 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) to estimate the economic costs to society over the lifetime of all people who report experiencing IPV at some point in their lives.

PreventConnect Web Conference

Please join PreventConnect, the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, and CDC researchers to learn more about the long-term economic cost of intimate partner violence and implications for prevention policy and practice, September 13, 2018 at 2 pm Eastern.

Register for The Economic Cost of Intimate Partner Violence: Implications for Prevention.

Key Findings

  • The lifetime per-victim cost was $103,767 for women and $23,414 for men. This reflected differences in outcomes (e.g., rape-related pregnancy), differences in the number of affected victims by sex for particular outcomes, as well as a lack of studies on this topic that include male victims.
  • The lifetime per-victim cost is for adults who report experiencing IPV at some point in their lives. This includes almost 32 million women and 12 million men who are victims of IPV during their lives.
  • This cost includes things like medical costs, lost work productivity, and criminal justice costs.

Prevention

  • Preventing IPV is a priority for CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.
  • IPV is not inevitable. It is a public health problem that can be prevented.
  • CDC places an emphasis on primary prevention—stopping violence before it begins.
  • CDC has a technical package to help states and communities take advantage of the best available evidence to prevent IPV.
 
The Internet of Things Misuse and Safety Strategies
Link to register: https://ta2ta.org/webinars/registration/internet-of-things-misuse-and-safety-strategies.html?utm_source=Partners+events+9%2F1%2F18&utm_campaign=Webinars+early+Sept&utm_medium=email
Provided by: National Network to End Domestic Violence
Date: Saturday, September 15, 2018
Time: 5:00 am – 6:30 am ChST


Manufacturers are connecting everything to the Internet: your fridge, your car, your TV, security cameras, even sex toys! We'll learn why and how almost everything around us is being woven into the Internet of Things (IoT), and how that affects survivor safety and privacy. We will also look at other emerging technology and the implications for our work to increase survivor safety.
 
 
 
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Domestic Violence-Related Mass and Spree Killings
Link to register: https://events-na1.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2361243497/en/events/event/private/2359510337/2424280655/event_registration.html?sco-id=2670674958&_charset_=utf-8
Provided by: Battered Women’s Justice Project
Date: Tuesday, September 18, 2018
Time: 5:00 am – 6:30 am ChST

Content: Dr. Websdale will define mass and spree killing and explain the differences between familicidal, felonious, and non-felony related forms of these offenses. The webinar will concentrate on two forms of "public" mass and spree killings. The first form consists of those cases where the complex dynamics of domestic violence are of central significance and appear to be the principal precipitant of the killings. These cases involve offenders killing former or current spouses/partners and/or those such as family law attorneys, allied professionals, and/or friends who may have supported the spouse or partner. The second form involves those public mass killings, usually shootings, where domestic violence forms but one aspect of the case but may nevertheless be central to developing an understanding of the killings. Dr. Websdale will use case illustrations to flesh out themes across case types, examining, for example, the gendering of these offenses, the signaling of offenses, histories of intimate terrorism, planning and preparation, the possible role of mental illness, the social isolation of offenders, fascination and proficiency with weaponry, threatening changes in the life circumstances of offenders, and the role of suicidal feelings, depression, rage, extreme hatred, and vengefulness.

Presenters: Dr. Neil Websdale, Director, Family Violence Institute, Northern Arizona University. Hosted by Kathleen Ferraro, Director of Training & Curriculum, Family Violence Institute, Northern Arizona University

Learn more and register now!
 
Ensuring Meaningful Access to Limited English Proficient Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence Webinar Series -- Part III: Developing an Effective Language Access Plan
Link to register: https://events-na1.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2297520381/en/events/event/shared/default_template_simple/event_registration.html?sco-id=2632565363&_charset_=utf-8&utm_source=Partners+events+9%2F15%2F18&utm_campaign=Webinars+late+sept&utm_medium=email

Provided by: National Latin@ Network
Date: September 19, 2018
Time: 2:00 am – 3:00 am ChST

Session III of the series will engage participants in a process of critical thinking and planning that will support organizations/agencies in developing an effective language access plan. In order to carry out effective safety planning and provide critical information to assist ALL survivors in making informed choices, it is imperative to ensure meaningful access to services and available options for survivors with limited English proficiency. Under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, all organizations that receive federal funding must take reasonable steps to ensure meaningful access to individuals with Limited English Proficiency (LEP). Join us as we discuss concrete steps for developing an effective language access plan.

Click here to register

 
Reducing Gender Bias in Sexual Assault Response and Investigation
Link to register: https://www.evawintl.org/WebinarDetail.aspx?webinarid=1060
Provided by: End Violence Against Women International
Date: Wednesday, September 19, 2018
Time: 2:00 am ChST


Course Description
 
Systematic, thorough, and impartial law enforcement investigations must seek to avoid drawing on gender-based stereotypes and attitudes at every step of the process. This is why the US Department of Justice (DOJ) published groundbreaking guidance for law enforcement in 2015, entitled, Identifying and Preventing Gender Bias in Law Enforcement Response to Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence.
 
In this webinar, we will explore the phenomenon of gender bias, both explicit (conscious) and implicit (unconscious), and the resulting stereotypes and attitudes that can influence the professional response to, and investigation of, sexual assault. Many of the same principles apply to cases of intimate partner violence and other gender-based violence.
 
We will begin by introducing the concept of implicit bias, and then address key questions about how gender bias can disadvantage (or advantage) either the victim or suspect. For example, we will examine the relationship between gender bias and victim selection at the time of the sexual assault, as well as victim blaming afterward. We will also evaluate how gender bias plays a critical role in the designation of false reports in cases of sexual assault, and consider the intersection of gender bias and victim recantations. Parallels will be drawn to other types of gender-based violence.

 
Learning Objectives
 
As a result of this webinar, participants will be better able to: 
  • Define the concept of implicit bias, and explore how gender bias can influence law enforcement responses and investigations of sexual assault.
  • Examine the relationship between gender bias and victim selection, victim blaming, false reports, and victim recantations in sexual assault cases. 
  • Describe policies and practices that can help to avoid gender bias and increase our opportunities to identify, arrest, and prosecute perpetrators of sexual assault.
  • Explore parallels with intimate partner violence and other gender-based crimes.

If you are unable to attend the live webinar, it will be available as a recording in our webinar archive shortly after the event.
 
Serving Both Sides: Navigating Domestic Violence Against Service Users
Link to register: https://events-na11.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/1083844668/en/events/event/shared/1099426672/event_landing.html?sco-id=1927148602&utm_source=Partners+events+9%2F15%2F18&utm_campaign=Webinars+late+sept&utm_medium=email

Provided by: VERA Center on Victimization and Safety
Date: September 19, 2018
Time: 3:00 am – 4:30 am ChST

Many disability providers have an explicit commitment to serve all people with a disability in their community, no matter what.  At the same time, they are increasingly aware of the likelihood of domestic violence within their communities, the complexities of domestic violence, and the unique dynamics that domestic violence creates, particularly when both parties are users of their organization's services. On any given day, a disability service provider could be serving both parties in a domestic violence situation. Because of this, disability providers may be grappling with how to uphold their commitment to serve all while also ensuring that victims feel safe receiving services from their organization. This webinar will begin to explore the importance of policies to ensure effective and safe services for all people served as well as some important considerations when developing such a policy at your organization. 
 
 
Back to School: Youth Leadership as Violence Prevention Work
Link to register: https://events-na1.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2154191300/en/events/event/shared/default_template_simple/event_landing.html?sco-id=2403133723&utm_source=Partners+events+9%2F15%2F18&utm_campaign=Webinars+late+sept&utm_medium=email

Provided by: Northwest Network
Date: September 19, 2018
Time: 4:00 am – 5:30 am ChST

As the traditional school year starts for many young people, this webinar will focus on tools to support youth leadership for youth outside of that system. While the goal for webinar participants is to build skills to support youth self-determination and leadership broadly, our data and experience pulls largely from experiences with homeless and unstably housed youth. Both in practice and policy, these skills are critical in prevention work with young people and their support networks.

This webinar will 1) unpack the impacts of adultism on youth and how it affects experiences of violence and 2) walk through organizational tools for supporting youth self-determination and organizational input.

Click here to register
 
Building Girls’ Protective Assets in Indian Country: Intentional Girl-Centered Program Design
Link to register: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/299490860712802051?utm_source=All+Subscribers&utm_campaign=bf8423714d-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_07_30_04_16_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_347d47d8e9-bf8423714d-132884909
Provided by: National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center
Date: Thursday, September 20, 2018
Time: 5:00 am – 6:30 am ChST

Content: The protective asset building approach emerged internationally in the late 1990s as a way to increase teenage girls’ resilience and overall capabilities. Girl-centered protective asset programs have been shown to help girls in different parts of their lives. These include having greater confidence, lower chances of experiencing sexual assault, better school performance, more health knowledge, and enhanced life planning skills. This webinar will describe how the protective assets approach is being adapted for girls in Indian Country, and how you can join an initiative to help you build such a program in your own community.

Learn more and register now!
 
A SAFeR Approach to Considering Child-Related Relief in Orders for Protection
Link to register: https://events-na1.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2361243497/en/events/event/shared/2408931183/event_registration.html?sco-id=2670690316&_charset_=utf-8
Provided by: Battered Women’s Justice Project
Date: Thursday, September 20, 2018
Time: 5:00 am – 6:30 am ChST

Content: Battered parents frequently struggle to secure statutorily permitted child-related relief in civil protection orders. This webinar will introduce one strategy that advocates, attorneys, and survivors can use to close the gap between what the law allows by way of temporary custody in civil protection order cases and what petitioners are able to achieve. The strategy is known as "SAFeR." It is a practical approach to screening, assessing, and responding to the lived experience of intimate partner abuse in child custody disputes.

Presenters: Gabrielle Davis, Legal & Policy Advisor, Battered Women's Justice Project. Hosted by Monica Player, National Center on Protection Orders & Full Faith and Credit

Learn more and register now!
 
Using Civil Protection Orders to Prevent Forced Marriages
Link to register:  https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/910995254582012673?utm_source=Partners+events+9%2F15%2F18&utm_campaign=Webinars+late+sept&utm_medium=email

Provided by: Tahirih Justice Center Forced Marriage Initiative
Date: September 21, 2018
Time: 4:00 am – 5:00 am ChST

This webinar will feature Lisa V. Martin, Assistant Professor at University of South Carolina's School of Law. Professor Martin is the author of Restraining Forced Marriage, the first report to undertake a detailed evaluation of the viability of civil protection orders to address forced marriage in the United States. Although protection orders show promise as a tool to prevent forced marriage in many states, the nuances of current legal standards defining what kinds of abuse - and by whom - are covered severely limits the practical utility of most civil protection orders for those without expert representation. Drawing on her research, Professor Martin will cover the following topics during this webinar:
  • background on the dynamics of forced marriage cases;
  • essential considerations when working with immigrant survivors;
  • guidance for pursuing protection orders in forced marriage cases under current state-based legal regimes; and
  • advocacy opportunities and expert guidance for how to make protection orders more accessible and effective for individuals facing forced marriage
 
 
 
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Gathering Technology Abuse Evidence in Protection Order Cases
Link to register: https://events-na1.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2361243497/en/events/event/shared/2408931183/event_registration.html?sco-id=2671005560&_charset_=utf-8
Date: Thursday, September 27, 2017
Time: 3:00 am – 4:30 am ChST

Content: Communication software, social media, and location services are increasingly used to stalk, harass, and terrorize. This interactive webinar will examine the technologies most commonly misused in domestic violence cases and outline the process for gathering and admitting evidence of tech abuse. Participants will learn about ethical issues related to online evidence collection, how to provide clients with the tools to assist in gathering evidence, and how to admit  tech evidence in court.

Presenters: Ian Harris, JD, Technology Safety Legal Manager, Safety Net Project National Network to End Domestic Violence. Hosted by Monica Player, National Center on Protection Orders & Full Faith and Credit

Learn more and register now!
 
Reading Between the Lines: Case File Review for SARTs
Link to register: https://www.evawintl.org/WebinarRegistration.aspx?webinarid=1058
Provided by: End Violence Against Women International
Date: Friday, September 28, 2018
Time: 2:00 am – 3:30 am ChST


Course Description
 
Throughout our country, communities have long struggled with their response to sexual violence. In many instances, the criminal justice system has shown itself to be inadequate and has often failed those who most need it to work. From initial police reports to decisions that prosecutors make in court, the U.S. criminal justice system has a long way to go before sexual assault is treated as the violent crime that it is, offenders are held accountable for their actions, and victims of sexual assault are treated with the respect and dignity they deserve.
 
In 2016, the Sexual Violence Justice Institute came out with a toolkit entitled What Do Sexual Assault Cases Look Like in Our Community? A SART Coordinator's Guidebook for Case File Review, which is a step-by-step guide for sexual assault response teams to use to look at case files to identify what is working well within their community's response as well as identify gaps as a way to create lasting systems change. Case files hold the "official" record of a survivor's experience. From the language used in capturing the experience to steps taken or not taken, case files offer great insight into frameworks responders use, the ways that their work is organized, and how the disciplines interact with each other.
 
Through the process of looking at case files, SARTs are able to look at the system as a whole to learn more about the current response to sexual violence. While case file review can present challenges, it is a powerful tool to identify and implement strategies for sexual assault cases to be more successfully investigated and documented and to evaluate current policies and practices of SART agencies.
 
From this webinar, participants should leave with a better understanding of how case file review can be used as an evaluative measure and method of systems change work as well as gain practical skills and tools to implement case file review in their community. 

 
Objectives
 

As a result of this webinar, participants will be better able to: 

  • Understand how case file review can be used to assess the criminal justice response to sexual assault.
  • Recognize the importance of reviewing cases as a strategy of systems change work. 
  • Implement strategies for conducting case file review, including applying practical skills and steps for how to engage SARTs in Case File Review.
  • Apply best practices to address concerns about confidentiality and improving the system response.

Presenters


Jessica Jerney, M.Ed, Evaluation and Research Coordinatior, Sexual Violence Justice Institute, Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault, Saint Paul, MN
Jessica Jerney works with SVJI to support multidisciplinary teams as they evaluate and assess their response to sexual violence. She does this through training and technical assistance and works to align evaluation goals with team capacity and priorities. She is also interested in advancing the field by ensuring practice, policy and other decisions are based on the latest pertinent research.
For over fifteen years Jessica has worked with community-based organizations in urban and rural communities as an organizer, educator, and evaluator. Her passion lies in the areas of social justice, capacity building and data-driven decision-making. She has worked with numerous youth organizations, locally and internationally, to build, evaluate, and improve programs. Jessica holds a masters of education in youth development leadership and a graduate certificate in program evaluation from the University of Minnesota.
 

 
Jolene Engelking, MSW, MDiv, Project Development Specialist, Sexual Violence Justice Institute, Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault, Saint Paul, MN
 
Jolene Engelking is the Project Development Specialist at the Sexual Violence Justice Institute at the Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault. She develops resources and trainings on a range of sexual violence topics, leads the Case File Review Project, and provides technical assistance to sexual assault responses teams in Minnesota and nationally.
 
Ms. Engelking joined SVJI@MNCASA in 2016. She has been in the anti-sexual violence movement since 2006, first as a volunteer and then working at a community based advocacy agency where she gained experience training advocates, engaging the community, and working with SARTs, particularly focusing on the needs of Native American victim/survivors.
 
In that time, Ms. Engelking was the advocacy representative on four area SARTs, including one tribal SARRT. After her time doing direct advocacy, she worked as a technical assistance provider and trainer through Praxis International's Advocacy Learning Center. She holds two master's degrees, in social work and divinity, both from Loyola University Chicago.
 

 
Language Access Planning, Part II
Date: Friday, September 28, 2018
Time: 3:00 am – 4:00 am ChST

Link to register: www.surveymonkey.com/MYLARespanol-eng

 
Using Federal Law to Increase Safety for Indian Women: TLOA and VAWA Implementation Efforts
Link to register: https://events-na1.adobeconnect.com/content/connect/c1/2361243497/en/events/event/private/2359510337/2424280655/event_registration.html?sco-id=2671337556&_charset_=utf-8
Date: Friday, September 28, 2018
Time: 5:00 am – 6:30 am ChST

Content: Native American women suffer domestic and sexual violence at epidemic rates. Federal law enforcement may be hours away from reservation crime scenes and resources are frequently stretched thin. Tribal police, prosecutors, and courts have had significant success in combating intimate partner violence committed by Indians in Indian country. But, because of a 1978 U.S. Supreme Court decision, tribes lacked the authority to prosecute a non-Indian defendant even if he lived on the reservation and was married to a tribal member. And, federal law limited tribes to imposing a maximum sentence of one year imprisonment regardless of how serious the offense. The Tribal Law and Order Act (2010) and the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 potentially and dramatically changed the legal authority of tribal courts and have provided federal prosecutors with new criminal offenses to use when holding offenders accountable. This webinar will cover the relevant changes to federal law, a summary of recent case law, and provide an update on implementation efforts for both Acts.

Presenters: Leslie A. Hagen, National Indian Country Training Coordinator, US Department of Justice. Hosted by Kathleen Ferraro, Director of Training & Curriculum and Professor of Sociology, Northern Arizona University

Learn more and register now!
 
Sagan Na Homlo Open House
Date: September 28, 2018
Time: 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Location:  Sagan Na Homlo, Mangilao

Sagan Na Homlo Open House